‘Lucifer’ Season Two Episode Five ‘Weaponizer’ [spoilers]

‘Lucifer’ Season Two Episode Five ‘Weaponizer’ [spoilers]

‘Lucifer’ Season Two Episode Five ‘Weaponizer’ [spoilers]

0 comments 📅31 October 2016, 09:08

Spoilers for episode five of Lucifer

As I said in my review of the previous episode of Lucifer, the juxtaposition of tone within the last two episodes didn’t work for me. It’s ironic, then, that episode five manages to make a major tonal shift work but work within a single episode. The end of episode four told us that someone was out to get Chloe to force Lucifer to return his mother to Hell. This danger comes in the form of Michael Imperioli as the angel Uriel. As an alumni of The Sopranos it’s fitting that Uriel is mostly here as an angelic leg breaker.

Lucifer is extremely paranoid about Chloe’s health and safety now that he knows Uriel is out to get him. We learned in season one that an angel can’t take a human life but Uriel has a way around that. He basically uses the butterfly effect. In the opening shot of the episode we watch him cause the car accident simply by moving a skateboard in a front lawn a few inches. It’s a neat workaround that works as a plot device because Lucifer can only combat it by forcing Chloe to do the exact opposite of what she usually does. It leads to one of the best exchanges of the season.

LUCIFER: For the next day or so, I’m gonna need you to be unpredictable. Whatever you normally do, just, you know, do the opposite.
CHLOE: Too bad, I was totally going to have sex with you today.
LUCIFER: Really? … Oh, well played Detective.

Our crime of the week is pretty basic but it does come with the added benefit of Chloe avoiding a shooter that was put in place by Uriel by explaining how much the car accident actually shook her up. The episode starts off playful but as the stakes rise with Uriel the tone begins to change. Amenadiel tries to confront Uriel by using his ego with no powers, but after Uriel beats him Amenadiel comes to the conclusion that he has fallen. This ends with a great speech from Lucifer about how no one knows what God really wants.

Lucifer

The episode ends with Lucifer confronting Uriel in an abandoned church of all things. Uriel says all he has to do is push a key on the organ and, in two days, Chloe will die. He also seems to have acquired Azrael’s blade which can wipe even angelic beings from existence. Lucifer does his best to fight Uriel until Maze steps in and also tries to defeat him but he’s stronger than both of them. Uriel is about to hit the key when Lucifer takes the fallen blade and kills his brother. We’ve only seen Lucifer deal with death once in season one but this one is different. Lucifer even says ‘but he was my brother’ when Maze points out that he had it coming.

The episode ends with Lucifer stumbling into his penthouse and into his mother’s arms looking utterly shattered by the entire thing. He previously said in season one that he was not a cold blooded murderer and now he has killed his younger brother. An episode that started with Lucifer and Dan bonding over a slain action star ends with Lucifer the most vulnerable we have ever seen him. Uriel whispers something as he dies but Lucifer claims he didn’t understand it.

These are the sort of episodes that keep me watching somewhat inconsistent shows, and the preview for the episode on the 31st looks like Lucifer is really struggling with what he did. As for where his mother fits into all of this and why Amenadiel is losing his powers still isn’t touched on and I’m getting a little impatient waiting for those plots to move forward. Overall, though, this is one of my favorite episodes of Lucifer thus far.

Lucifer airs Mondays at 9PM eastern / 8PM central on FOX.

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Kaitlyn Booth
Kaitlyn Booth

Kaitlyn Booth is a writer, film critic, comic lover, and soccer fan based in Salt Lake City. She has covered such events as the Sundance Film Festival, San Diego Comic Con, and New York Comic Con and been a special guest and panelist at Salt Lake Comic Con and FanX. She has a deep fondness for female superheroes and independent film.

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